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VOLUME 9 ISSUE 3

GET IN THE KNOW!

Monday, November 12, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dvar Torah: Why do We Pray?

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Dr. Vitow’s Nomination for Best Principal

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JLC Comes to NSHAHS

 

 

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North Shore’s Open House

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Advice Column: Time Management

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Sophomore Seminar

 

 

 

 

Dvar Torah: Why do We Pray?

by Dalia Etessami

 

Dvar Torah: Why do We Pray?A major part of our lives as Jews is Tefilah. There are three tefilot that we pray every day: Shacharit in the morning, Mincha in the afternoon, and Arvit in the evening. But, many students ask, why do we pray? What are the origins of these three prayers?
In the Gemara, there is a debate about what the basis of the three daily prayers is. Rabbi Yose bar Rabbi Hanina says that the weekday prayers were instituted by the Avot: Shacharit by Avraham, Mincha by Yitzchak, and Maariv by Yaakov. Rabbi Joshua ben Levi opposes this, citing Rabbi Hanina, who says that the three daily prayer services were instituted in accordance with the three daily korbanot made in the Beit Hamikdash. But why does this distinction matter? What difference does it make whether tefilah comes from the Avot or from Korbanot?
One answer is that from this distinction we can learn whether prayer is something we choose to do as individuals, taking time out of our day to have a conversation with Hashem, as the Avot prayed originally, or something that we are required to do as a community to maintain a connection with Hashem, like the Korbanot. The answer is that prayer is a combination of both.


There is a mandatory element to Tefilah that we are commanded to do, as well as a voluntary element, that requires each person to make the time set aside for prayer their own. The prayers we read from the siddur act as a guideline to what we should say and pray to G-d for, but the beauty of prayer comes when we can utilize this time to really connect by having a conversation with Hashem about our feeling, desires and troubles, that we face at the different points throughout the day when we stop to pray, the way each of the Avot did.


Additionally, the dual sources indicates that prayer has both a communal element and a personal element. We gather together in minyanim to pray, as the nation gathered in the Beit Hamikdash to perform Korbanot. But, each of us must still foster an individual connection to Hashem in our prayers in order for it to have a personal meaning.

 

 

Dr. Vitow’s Nomination for Best Principal

by Shira Cohen 

 

Dr. Vitow’s Nomination for Best Principal

Dr. Vitow, our amazing headmaster, has been nominated for Best Principal in The Best of Long Island competition for 2019, which is held by the Long Island Press. He has been selected in addition to thirteen other principals from various schools and parts of Long Island. These include principals from Catholic schools, public schools and even a special education school. Dr. Vitow is the only nominee representing a Jewish school which is a tremendous privilege.


Dr. Vitow has been the headmaster of North Shore Hebrew Academy High School for many years and has done an outstanding job. He’s always willing to help students in need and give them the best advice. When students are unhappy with their schedules, he tries his hardest to satisfy them and do what’s best for their education. It is a great honor for our school to be recognized in such a way and be able show our Jewish pride. It is a huge kiddush Hashem.


The students have been very enthusiastic about voting for Dr. Vitow in the hopes that he’ll win. Many teachers and students have even been featured on the school’s own Instagram page holding signs that say #votevitow and Vote Now!!. Each day a reminder is sent out to the whole the school and all the parents reminding them to vote. Voting will end on December 15th and the results will be added up. The principal with the most votes will hold the title of: Best Principal of Long Island for the year 2019; hopefully that will be Dr. Vitow.


Dr. Vitow has been very humble about this nomination and grateful for all the support he’s been getting. Even if he doesn’t win, we all know he’s best!

 

 

JLC Comes to NSHAHS

by Ruben Prawer

 

JLC Comes to NSHAHSThe North Shore Hebrew Academy High School offers over 100 clubs, ranging from Investing Club, to Medical Minds, to the Creative Writing Club. Each club is unique and offers something new. This year, there is a new club called JLC, which stands for Jewish Life Committee. The founders and presidents of this new club are Jeremy Bassali and Ruben Prawer. The club’s primary goal is to improve upon the Jewish life and Jewish culture in the school. This ranges from small things like making sure there are Netilat Yadayim cups in the lunch room and in all the bathrooms to bigger things like planning events for Chanukah and other holidays. Other ideas include a Shabbos Cart on Fridays as people leave school and an email address where people can anonymously ask questions for someone from the Judaic faculty to answer (it’s like a 24/7 “Shoot the Rabbi”). The committee has already started bringing meaningful and lasting improvements to the school, and its members are looking to continue to do so.

 

 

North Shore’s Open House

by Shoshana Horn 

 

North Shore’s Open House

North Shore rocks! We are not only the #1 school, but this year’s Open House was an extraordinary success. There were more people than ever before at the open house, and according to our outstanding Headmaster Dr. Daniel Vitow: “This is the first time ever that we needed to open the balcony of the shul as we ran out of seats on the main level.” Every guest received a wonderful, sling swag bag filled with a welcome packet, a colorful brochure, and a green umbrella. Our inspiring Principal Rabbi Dr. Noam Weinberg welcomed every visitor and recited a perek of Tehilim in order to commemorate and pray for the victims of the Pittsburg tragedy, then our 67 member Choir performed brilliantly. The audience was riveted. Dr. Vitow even said “My favorite part of the open house is watching the expression on people's faces as they listen to our choir perform.” According to Ms. Sandy Sudberg, our Director of Music and Performing Arts, the Choir “sang Hallelujah Laolam, Israel’s winning song in the 1979 Eurovision Song Festival. Last year, new lyrics were added in celebration of Israel’s 70th birthday, and the song became popular again. I chose this song because it’s a happy song about hope and love of Israel.” The guests then went to the gym, where there was a student panel comprised of expert Juniors and Seniors who answered many questions, moderated by Dr. Vitow. There were some refreshments and a visually stunning art panel of students’ greatest works. North Shore’s guests were then treated to an exciting look around the school as they searched for various teachers and their dynamic classes, getting a sneak peek into a student’s daily learning experience. We hope to see all the prospective students attending North Shore next year!

 

 

Advice Column: Time Management

by Lea Chen

 

Advice Column: Time ManagementNow that the holidays have passed and classes have begun to get into their stride, many students have noticed their workload and amount of exams increasing, often having 2-4 tests per week. You might be caught off guard by this change and feel overwhelmed, but you will be able to do well under these conditions once you get something nailed down. Such a thing will allow you to remain calm and succeed despite the immense amount of tests. Can you guess what this thing is? It's Time Management.


I often get asked how I manage my time, and I always explain that it's quite systematic. Time management is all about having your own system. It varies for everyone and it takes a while to figure it out, but if you keep trying different methods you will find what works for you. However, the most important thing and the key essence of time management is to never leave things for the last minute.


For tests, what I suggest doing is not to start studying the day before the test especially when you have more than one test that day. You should start studying a few days before (I personally study three days before the test) so you can spread out the material and not overwork yourself. What I like to do when I have more than one test to study for on the same day is to create a time table. I assign a certain time for each subject, add in the daily things that I have to do, and also leave some leeway for everyday occurrences that require some more time.


Here’s an example of one of my weeknight study schedules:
Eat - 6-6:30
Study AP Psych - 6:35-8:05
Study Pre-Calc - 8:10-9:35
Shower - 9:40-10:15


We often get so many assignments and homework to do that it becomes overbearing, and it’s not uncommon that students forget to do their work. What I like to do is to create a checklist. I write down everything that I have to do right when it’s assigned so that I can refer to it whenever I have free time or know that I’m forgetting to do something. Once I complete the assignment, I check it off of the list, feeling quite satisfied. Always try to keep in mind that whenever you're bored or on your phone or doing something unproductive, you could be doing something useful and productive. If you remind yourself this enough, it will actually motivate you to get stuff done. You might be surprised in your increase in efficiency!

 

 

Sophomore Seminar

by Rebeka Nissan 

 

Sophomore Seminar

This year, the sophomores were very fortunate to be able to attend the Sophomore Seminar at camp Seneca Lake. After a short bus ride, the students had access to all of Seneca’s beautiful amenities. The girls were able to do Zumba, baking and arts and crafts with Ms. Spector. The boys had access to all sports arenas and the workout room, as well as fishing with Rabbi Weinberg and Rabbi Schrier. They then went to Sky Zone, an indoor recreational trampoline park, and enjoyed the open jumping space, dodgeball and foam pit areas. After a late night barbecue, they were entranced by the magic of Shlomo Levinger. Even though it was raining and they could not make an outdoor bonfire, the sophomores made do by happily singing together until 2:00 am!


They were grateful to be able to sleep late the next morning, and were able to relax and play Bingo with Rabbi Beitler, where the winners won amazing prizes. Then, they participated in a series of team building exercises. The grade was split up into four separate groups, and everyone learned essential skills such as trust, communication, problem solving and teamwork. These lessons were taught through fun activities, like the floor is lava, which everyone was happy to participate in. The last stop on this trip was to the Galleria Mall. There, students were able to shop around the mall, or see a movie. By the time they loaded the buses to return to school, everyone appreciated the amazing experience that they had on the Sophomore Seminar. Special thanks to Rabbi Weinberg and Rabbi Beitler for organizing this amazing trip, which was a pleasure for both the students and faculty who attended.

 

 

Editors-in-Chief: Dalia Etessami, Anna Glasman, Sophie Goldman
Writing Staff: Daniel Kroll, Lea Chen, Adriel Kohananoo, Kayla Kreinik, Shoshana Horn, Dylan Makani, Aviram Nessim, Ruben Prawer, Shlomo Shavolian, Ella Shakin, Nathan Maidi, Jeremy Bassali, Talia Dror, Jeremy Bernstein, Shira Cohen, Rebeka Nissan
Faculty Advisor: Mrs. April Zabinsky