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VOLUME 7 ISSUE 8

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Sunday, December 4, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dvar Torah on Parshat Vayeitzei: Appreciating the Small Things

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Yale Model Congress 2016

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Veracross-ing into a New Era!

 

 

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LIU Professor visits NSHAHS

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DECA Tryouts

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Filmmaking Club

 

 

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Student Poetry

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Fires In Israel

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MLB Collective Bargaining Agreement

 

 

 

 

Dvar Torah on Parshat Vayeitzei: Appreciating the Small Things

by Caylie Tuerack

 

Dvar Torah on Parshat Vayeitzei: Appreciating the Small ThingsIn this week's parsha, Parshat Vayeitzei, there is an important lesson to be learned about appreciating the simpler things in life. Yaakov hears an amazing revelation from G-d as he is sleeping at "the place" on his way to Charan. This place is Har HaMoriah, the future site of the Beit Hamikdash, and therefore is a very holy place. G-d comes to Yaakov in a dream and promises that He will personally protect Yaakov and ensure the fruitfulness of his descendents in the land of Israel, which is to be their land. G-d also promises to not abandon Yaakov and return him safely to the land of Canaan. After hearing something this powerful and sacred, it is natural to assume that Yaakov would feel the holiness of the location where he was sleeping and pray for spiritual guidance and support as he travels on the rest of his journey to Charan. However, that is not the case. Yaakov asks for bread to eat and clothing to wear, things he requires for his physical well-being, as opposed to things for spiritual sustenance. The question here is why. Why after G-d makes such a sacred promise to Yaakov does he feel the need to ask for mundane things such as food and clothing, and why does he feel the need to explain their functions of being eaten and worn to G-d?

The answer, according to Rabbi Boruch Leff, is that Yaakov is reiterating the idea that he only needs food and clothing for their most basic purposes, to keep him fed and clothed. He doesn't take pleasures from different kinds of delicious foods and he doesn't go out of his way to find special and beautiful clothes. He lives a life without luxuries as an acknowledgement that he lives his life to serve G-d, not to indulge in unnecessary pleasures.

Sometimes, as people, we get so caught up in the trends and worry so much about conforming to what's in style that we lose sight of what's really important in our lives, our connection to G-d and our families. We lose the ability to appreciate what we have and how much of a blessing it all is. We live in a society where because we are so focused on getting the better version of everything, what we have seems to become dull in comparison. It's easy today to forget that we need to be thankful for everything we have, even if it is only a piece of bread. We must learn from Yaakov that life is not about whether you own the most expensive clothing and designer labels or eat the most gourmet foods, rather it's about understanding that G-d gave us all the fundamental things we need to live and allowed us to merit enjoying even more than what we need in actuality. Start to look around and appreciate the small things you have. Don't focus on designer brands or fancy labels, but learn to be thankful that you have clothing to wear. Appreciate spending time with your family and learn to cherish every moment that you have the zechut to be with them. Trends come and go, but a real appreciation for all the little things we have in life is an everlasting lesson.

 

 

Yale Model Congress 2016

by Aryeh Hajibay 

 

Yale Model Congress 2016

This past weekend, a group of students from grades 9-12 with a unique interest in policy-making and our government had the privilege of participating in the annual Yale Model Congress. The Yale Model Congress, a simulation of our legislature on Capitol Hill, enables students to witness firsthand the intricacies of the political process. Delegates to the conference debated a wide range of highly controversial topics and even had the chance to sponsor their very own legislation. Students began the conference serving in their respective committees, each dealing with a specific set of issues, and those fortunate enough to pass their bills were able to present them in a full session of the U.S. Congress. After weeks of preparing for the conference, NSHAHS's delegation, with the guidance of Mr. David Miles, made meaningful contributions to the discussions and were, for the most part, successful in having their legislation passed.

Junior Caylie Tuerack, a member of the Education and the Workforce Committee, passed a bill that guaranteed paid family leave to mothers after giving birth. Ariella Hajibay, a freshman who participated in her first Model Congress, unanimously passed a bill that proposed to resettle children refugees from Syria in the United States. Daniel Kroll, a freshman who served on the Appropriations Committee, passed a bill that would provide fair housing to victims of domestic abuse. Clearly, the weeks of hard work that went into preparing for the Model Congress paid off. We wishe the Model Congress members the best of luck as they move forward in public speaking and debating public policy.

 

 

Veracross-ing into a New Era!

by Elan Itschakov

 

Veracross-ing into a New Era!A new system, Veracross, was introduced to NSHAHS's staff, students, and parents. This system was introduced to North Shore by Mrs. Robin Wilensky, Director of Educational Technology. A few years ago, Mrs. Wilensky saw a Veracross demo at a trade show and was immediately impressed. It took a couple of years to compile the student information system, directory, medical information, and attendance rosters, but everything is now up-to-date and operational. Throwing away our outdated system, we usher in a new era of technology and organization to NSHAHS.

Many teachers are satisfied with the new system's attendance and grading application. And many students and parents love their ability to access the student directory, grades, and attendance records. The office staff appreciate the new system because it is capable of compiling and storing information accurately in the system. Veracross is a cutting edge system that seamlessly integrates all student data from applicants to alumni.

 

 

LIU Professor visits NSHAHS

by Yaakov Spraragen 

 

LIU Professor visits NSHAHS

Students taking Mr. Doug Garfinkel's business classes at NSHAHS were privileged to have professors from LIU Post come in and teach fascinating lessons. The college level courses, which include marketing, investing, accounting, and virtual enterprise, are affiliated with an outstanding LIU credit program. This program not only lets students who complete classes receive credit towards college, but it sends top professors from the business department at LIU to NSHAHS three times a semester.

The marketing lecture revolved around consumer behavior. Students were given a creative activity in which they had to sort through a consumer's trash to get an understanding of what types of products he likes to purchase. The class then had to write an analysis of the trash and brainstorm about what type of products they could potentially sell to that consumer. The accounting lesson was more of a question-answer format, in which students had the opportunity to ask the experienced LIU professor about the ins and outs of accounting in the business world. The professor taught about the complexity of accounting and the important role it serves in business.

The business class students enjoyed the informative and interactive lessons from the college professor!

 

 

DECA Tryouts

by Ian Terzi

 

DECA TryoutsIn order to prepare students for the business world, NSHAHS started a DECA club. DECA is an international business competition in which students can compete at different levels to represent their school. Students begin by completing in the Local competition on Long Island, and then a select number of qualifying students advance to States and then to Nationals. The DECA program in NSHAHS is run by Mr. Doug Garkfinkel, Instructor of Business Education, and Mrs. Robin Wilensky, Director of Educational Technology, who teach club members business tips and strategies. Being that this is the second year that NSHAHS is doing DECA, no one has made it to the Nationals yet.

This week, DECA had its Long Island competition at the school, which is the first level of competition. Normally, the Long Island competition takes place in a public school building on a Saturday, but DECA permitted NSHAHS to create its own competition to qualify for New York State competition. As a result, various teachers proctored students, including Mrs. Jane Rosenberg, Mrs. Robin Wilensky, Mrs. Nora Greene, Ms. Mariangela Ferraro, and Ms. Michelle Rizzacasa. These teachers listened to the business pitches presented by students for multiple business categories, including sports marketing, apparel and marketing, buying and merchandising, and financial services. Over 40 North Shore students participated, along with two students from Hewlett High School. Mr. Garfinkel remarked that "We hope to take many of the qualifying competitors to the New York State competition in March."

 

 

Filmmaking Club

by Yair Atlas  

 

Filmmaking Club

With every new year at NSHAHS comes new after school activities. This year, senior Ariel Spielman started a film club. So far, there have been two meetings.

At the first meeting, the club looked at the script for The Social Network, a film about Mark Zuckerberg, and proceeded to watch that scene in the movie. This allowed attendees to see which aspects of the film are shown by the writer and which aspects are revealed by the actors. Later, clips with and without special effects from Mad Max: Fury Road were played. This showed the impressive special and practical effects used in modern movies.

In the future, the club plans to focus on analyzing other TV and movie scripts. Additionally, club members will be given the opportunity to write their own scripts. Members will be taught proper writing format, software, character structure, and dynamics. Furthermore, students will discuss the process of hiring actors, using specialized equipment, and submitting films to contests and festivals. Members will write a short film or 6-11 minute long TV pilot, and then club will vote on a winner. The club intends to host a short film festival for other students to attend.

 

 

Student Poetry

by Stacy Okin

 

Student PoetryAt The Dock

The smell of salt and the reflection of the light
A sun in the cloudless sky
Long grass are skyscrapers to ants and tickle my feet as I walk
Wind burning my cheeks
The sun's kiss melts the frost
I follow the set path like everyone else to the pier
Listening to the scruff as I walk

The wooden poles of the dock are perfectly aligned
Like soldiers waiting for battle
Wind, provoking the water, antagonizes the smooth surface
The water twists and turns in compliancy,
As the boat shouts in frustration
I look up to the heavens

I watch the seagulls float on with ease
They fly without a care in the world
Seagulls glide in spastic spirals
Their path undetermined
The sun is hot on my head
And when all is said
I'd rather be a seagull

 

 

Fires In Israel

by Dalia Etessami 

 

Fires In Israel

Much of Israel was devastated last week, as major parts of the small nation were engulfed in flames. The statistics provide a horrifying portrayal of the fire's effect, as over 1,000 homes were damaged, forcing the evacuation of 60,000 residents and injuring over 200 people. Over 30,000 acres of the small country were burned. Many of those fires were near highly populated areas, such as Jerusalem and Haifa.

According to Israeli officials, some of the catastrophic flames were sparked by negligence. The hot, dry, windy November weather kindled the flames, causing them to spread wildly and making it difficult for firefighters to control them. Additionally, many of the fires are reported to have been maliciously started by Palestinian terrorists seeking the senseless evil of simply harming Israelis in any possible way. Some suspected perpetrators have been caught in the act, while others were found through clues, such as smoldered tires and Molotov cocktails, which were traced from areas near the ignition of such fires.

Despite the suffering brought to Israel from these dreadfully destructive fires, they have also highlighted some of the greatest aspects of the Israeli people and the effectiveness of their government. Many Israelis who were unaffected by the fires opened their homes to those who had lost theirs; others assembled care packages with supplies for those in need. Furthermore, other countries provided support to Israel in the form of equipment and firefighters. Not only did Israel's more reliable allies of America, Italy, Turkey, and Russia assist, but surprisingly so did Israel's Arab neighbors, including Egypt and Jordan. Palestinian Authority even temporarily set aside their issue with the Jewish nation to assist in putting out the flames, and many Arab communities opened their doors to all Israelis in need, including Jews and Christians. The catastrophic fires that ignited around Israel ultimately impacted the relations of the nation with its neighbors for the better.

 

 

MLB Collective Bargaining Agreement

by Josh Peyser

 

MLB Collective Bargaining AgreementThis past week, the baseball players and owners signed a new five year Collective Bargaining Agreement to prevent a lockout. This next season will be the 22nd straight year without a baseball lockout, far longer than the other three major sports. The details of the deal are still being revealed, but some of the significant changes are known. The length of the disabled list will change from fifteen days to ten, the luxury tax threshold will increase each year from $189 million, and there will be additional days off for players. In previous years, whichever league won the game would get home field advantage in the World Series, which means they would play games one, two, six, and seven in their home stadium. The all star game will no longer affect home field advantage in the World Series, and winning the all star game now means that the players in the winning team will get a certain amount of money. All in all, this was a huge win for Major League Baseball.

 

 

Editor-in-Chief: Arielle Rothman
Assistant Editors: Lia Berger, Shani Kahan, Yaakov Spraragen
Social Media: Alana Pearl
Writing Staff: Yair Atlas, Ben Baruch, Dalia Etessami, Anna Glasman, Sophie Goldman, Aryeh Hajibay, Ariella Hajibay, Shani Hashemi, Alexandra Iskhakov, Elan Itschakov, Leeal Kahen, Shaina Lavi, Natan Maidi, Stacy Okin, Ben Pagovich, Alana Pearl, Josh Peyser, Arielle Sarraf, Yaakov Spraragen, Ian Terzi, Caylie Tuerack
Faculty Advisor: Mrs. April Zabinsky