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VOLUME 8 ISSUE 9

GET IN THE KNOW!

Friday, April 27, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dvar Torah: Acharei Mot-Kedoshim

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Science Society Trip

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Yom Hazikaron Program

 

 

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April Student of the Month: Daniel Kroll

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SAAWA Science Fair

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Rube Goldberg Machine Contest

 

 

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Penn Model Congress

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New York Youth Summit

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Mock Trial Season Update

 

 

 

 

Dvar Torah: Acharei Mot-Kedoshim

by Shlomo Shaulian

 

Dvar Torah: Acharei Mot-Kedoshim In this week’s double Parsha of Acharei Mot and Kedoshim, the Torah talks about the laws of Yom Kippur, Korbanot, many Mitzvot and much more. In the second Passuk of Kedoshim, Hashem commands Bnei Yisrael, “Kedoshim Tihiyu,” that they shall be holy. What are we specifically being commanded to do when being told to “be holy”?
Rashi comments on this Passuk, and interprets it to mean that we must make a fence between us, and sins, in order to distance ourselves away from the sin. This means that not only should we not act sinfully, but also take precautionary steps to prevent any wrongdoing.
The Ramban similarly interprets this verse. The Ramban says that one should avoid making himself a “Navval,” a disgusting and desirous person. A “Naval” does not necessarily have to be someone who sins all the time and does not follow the Torah; examples of a “Navval” include someone who has many wives, and someone who eats meat and drinks wine all day long. The “Naval” avoids does not directly transgress any rules in the Torah because there are no specific prohibitions against his actions, but he still lives a disgusting, unholy life. So, by telling us to be “holy”, the Torah is not just warning us against committing specific sins, but also telling us that our all actions should be righteous and we should only act in a way that brings us closer to Hashem. Be’ezrat Hashem, we should all be able to become as close to Hashem as possible to serve our creator as best as we can!

 

 

Science Society Trip

by Jeremy Bernstein 

 

Science Society Trip

On Monday April 24th, the Science Society reconvened for their final out-trip of the year. Four dedicated science students came to Room 306 after school where they built infinitesimal cars powered by a fuel cell which used the hydrogen extracted from air as its source of energy. In addition, Mr. Wykes, the advisor of the society, provided a brief overview of the different forms of renewable energy so far, including solar energy, hydroponic energy, wind energy and geothermal energy. In addition to the aforestated, Mr. Wykes correspondingly presented a demonstration of a cylinder device found in most gasoline vehicles that function with fossil fuels, and as well discussed the negative impact of these fossil fuels on the planet. For instance, with the amount of fossil fuels being consumed and burned on a daily basis, humans technically require 9-12 Earths to minimize climate change, a luxury which is unfortunately nonexistent. Furthermore, this shortens the time it will take Earth to be emptied of fossil fuels, which is predicted to occur in our lifetime. On a more optimistic note, returning the narrative to science society’s meet, the four students which attended can conquer that the provided free pizza and fruit salad were delicious!
In addition to the hands-on activities in the engineering room, Science Society hit the road for their final out-trip. The destination was the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, located in the Huntington region, to attend the lab’s public lecture “Energy from Thin Air.” The address featured Rob Martienssen, a professor at the laboratory, and Frank O’Keefe, the CEO of Infinitree, a company which succeeded as a Virgin Earth Challenge Finalist (the competition only accepted 11 applications out of 5,000) whose focus is towards creating carbon-dioxide from air in greenhouses. The duo’s concept is to utilize Duckweed, a plant which grows in essentially small bodies of water, for its large carbon-dioxide intake as a source of energy. The process would be completed vertically in a indoor greenhouse. However, there were several issues that should be raised to attention. Firstly, the presenters indicated the use of biofuels, which use gasoline to break down materials such as corn or crop waste and convert these materials into energy. Although biofuels reduce the amount of gasoline utilized, it still requires the production of gasoline and fossil fuels. In addition, the United States proclaimed biofuels illegal due to a claim by Dr. C. R. Krishna from Brookhaven National Laboratory, who claimed that biofuels increase the harmful influence of pollution. In addition, the company Infinitree will be supplying devices which compact carbon dioxide and will feed it to the duckweed in order for the aquatic plants to create energy. However, this requires the production of carbon dioxide and if the United States (in the long-term future) becomes a 100% renewable nation and the rate of carbon dioxide radically decreases, the Duckweed may unfortunately not have the capability to generate electricity. Likewise, the production of carbon dioxide is typically against the general morals of renewable energy. Yet, despite the antecedent points, this concept has potential and will surely decrease the current rate of fossil fuels and gasoline to safer rates rather than completely subtracting these dangerous toxins from the atmosphere, which would be further ideal. Duckweed is also quite mobile, and, according to Dr. Martissen, "We’re interested in using or optimizing duckweed for use as a biomass biofuel based on its ability to grow on waste water and water in places which you would never imagine crops would grow."
After the interesting lecture, Mr. Wykes and his four society-members enjoyed the delicious goodies and refreshments served in the lobby prior to departing back to North Shore. In completion, any of those four students would certainly confirm how much fun and fascinating the trip was, and they would certainly agree to do it a second time.

 

 

Yom Hazikaron Program

by Rachel Sarraf

 

Yom Hazikaron ProgramLast Wednesday, North Shore Hebrew Academy High School commemorated the loss of all the fallen soldiers that risked their lives for the state of Israel. We honored and remembered 23,646 soldiers who sacrificed their lives for the establishment of the state of Israel. Morah Amir organized a beautiful Yom Hazikaron program along with her tenth grade students. The whole school gathered together in the main shul where the students spoke about fallen soldiers in Israel. Before the program began, the school stood up from their seats and had a moment of silence to honor the soldiers. Also, the program featured the chamber choir singing songs to honor the fallen soldiers of Israel. At the very end of the program all the students sang Hatikvah. After the program, the students went back to their classes and watched a short film called “When the Smoke Clears”. It was about three veteran soldiers who served in the Israeli Defense Forces and had both mental and physical injuries. After their traumatic experiences, they learn how to become stronger everyday by bonding together as a family. After watching it, students were to discuss the film with their peers and teacher. The movie gave students a lot to think about, as it brought up important topics that aren’t typically addressed, namely the post traumatic stress that many soldiers face after being on the battlefield, and the struggle to adapt to normal civilian life after their army service. Overall, the Yom Hazikaron program made for a very special and emotional day.

 

 

April Student of the Month: Daniel Kroll

by Adriel Kohananoo 

 

April Student of the Month: Daniel Kroll

Meet 10th grader Daniel Kroll, the April student of the month! Daniel is a smart, well-rounded, and motivated student. He always has something to say to add to discussions. Daniel says that his favorite class is English with Mr. Muir, because of his love for reading, and because the teacher picks good literature with interesting historical backgrounds that help contextualize the period in which it was written. He says that he also really enjoys Mr. Miles’ AP European History class because of his interest in history. In terms of extracurriculars, Daniel is involved in many programs, including Model Congress, Debate team, Mock Trial, Model UN and College Bowl. Daniel has achieved much success in these clubs, including two gavels in Penn Model Congress 2018. Interestly enough, Daniel loves sailing and has been doing it for nearly a decade now! Daniel’s other hobbies include building things, like cabinets or his gaming computer.
That’s not all, though. Daniel is also greatly involved in his community. He goes to Great Neck Synagogue weekly to help out with the youth program and many of the chesed programs they run for children. This summer, Daniel has an internship with a county court judge to get a firsthand experience of the legal system, and he also plans to have fun with his friends too.
We congratulate Daniel on this great achievement, and expect to see many more great things from him! Mazal Tov!

 

 

SAAWA Science Fair

by Dylan Makani

 

SAAWA Science FairThe majority of high school science fair competitions take place during the winter and spring months of the year, and The North Shore Hebrew Academy has participated in many science fairs this year. Most recently, North Shore students attended the South Asian American Women’s Alliance science fair. Despite the competition’s name, the competition is not only for women, and all students are invited to participate. The SAAWA science fair took place in the Merrick golf clubhouse. It included over one-hundred students in categories relating to biology, physics, engineering, as well as environmental sciences. Students were judged twice on average by a group of volunteers as well as research teachers. This year, the North Shore Hebrew Academy sent six students to participate in this exclusive science fair. Two such students were Eden Schneck and Aaron Lavi. Eden Schneck presented her project relating to the pollution of copper in the environment. Aaron Lavi presented his summer research work on the topic of disease. As we wait to hear back the results, we wish these students luck!

 

 

Rube Goldberg Machine Contest

by Ruben Prawer 

 

Rube Goldberg Machine Contest

Each year a group of North Shore students has the opportunity to participate in a very unique science competition: the Rube Goldberg Machine Contest. The objective of the Rube Goldberg competition is build a machine that completes a simple task in a very complicated way (a ball rolls down a ramp and knocks over dominoes which …). The teams must also have a theme or story along with their machine. This year the task was to pour a bowl of cereal. The North Shore delegation’s story was that they were chefs trying to build a device that could easily pour a bowl of cereal in the morning. The team, led by Scott Soifer with the help of Mr. Suchmann, worked for months putting the machine together. Ultimately, the hard work paid off as they came in first place! The team was invited to the national finals in Chicago, but since it is on a Saturday, North Shore will just be submitting a video online in advance of the competition.
Here is a video link to the machine running:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InKPHm-WHfA&list=PLJj8UG1wKqDsCsOOMuUWC8lgtkM3ujROT&index=2

 

 

Penn Model Congress

by Ruben Prawer

 

Penn Model CongressA group of North Shore students with a unique interest in our government and politics recently had the privilege of participating in the annual Penn Model Congress held at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The Penn Model Congress, a simulation of our legislature on Capitol Hill, allows students to witness the complexity of our political process, and it allows them to conduct that process just like our congressmen. At the conference delegates debated a wide range of key issues and even had the chance to sponsor their very own legislation. Students began the conference serving in their respective committees, each dealing with a specific set of issues, and those fortunate enough to pass their bills were able to present them in a full session. After weeks of preparing for the conference, NSHAHS’s delegation, with the guidance of Mr. Miles, made meaningful contributions to the discussions and were, for the most part, successful in having their legislation passed. Not only did the delegates succeed in passing their legislation, but several students were awarded for their meaningful contributions to the debates.
Kayla Hutt, a freshman who participated in the Environment and Public Works Committee, won an Honorable Mention for Best Delegate in Committee. Andrew Gottlieb, a junior and a justice on the Supreme Court, received an award for Outstanding Courtroom Team with Daniel Kroll, a sophomore, who served on the Foreign Affairs Committee and also won Best Delegate in Committee. Clearly, the weeks of hard work that went into preparing for the Model Congress paid off, and the NSN staff wishes the Model Congress members the best of luck as they move forward in public speaking and debating public policy.

 

 

New York Youth Summit

by Peter Suchmann 

 

New York Youth Summit

After many years of being a local competition, this year the Long Island Youth Summit became the New York Youth Summit. Almost two hundred students were invited from Westchester, Manhattan and Long Island to submit projects in order to win attendance at the Youth Summit held at Berkeley College in Manhattan. Eight students were selected as finalists from our school and were invited to attend - Rachel Brisman, Theo Berger, Aaron Baruch, Hannah Shedlo, Joseph Masri, Shelby Hakakian, Halli Fein and Jeremy Bernstein. Our students enjoyed a very inspiring Keynote address given by Dr. Yves Duroseau, Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital from Northwell Health, and two other discussions. One was given by a Columbia University Alumni and the other by an Amityville High School alumni of the Youth Summit.
Topics that were discussed in workshops this year included: Leadership, Teens and Criminal Justice, Sustainable Fashion, Renewable Energy, Climate Change, Community Health, Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Bullying. I am very proud to announce that Jeremy Bernstein had the winning essay in the Renewable Energy category. He also presented the outcomes of his workshop to the entire conference and did a great job answering all of the required questions. I helped conduct the panel on Climate Change this year and have accepted a seat on the Advisory Board of the NY Youth Summit in order to help it grow and improve. I will offer this competition again next year to my students.

 

 

Mock Trial Season Update

by Ruben Prawer

 

Mock Trial Season UpdateEvery year a mock trial is conducted by the state of New York in which high schools from all over the state compete against each other over the provided case. North Shore had the honor of competing against several schools from Nassau County including Uniondale High School, Shalhevet and Hicksville High School this year. While the competition was been fierce, North Shore managed to advance in this tournament. Forty schools were originally in the hunt to represent Nassau County in the tournament and over half of them had already been eliminated over the course of three trials. However, the team, lead by Joelle Galatan, Leeal Kahen, Eric Katan and Eden Ostrow with the guidance of Mrs. Ben-Sorek, and Mr. Muir continued to dominate and even advanced to the Sweet 16< round in which they argued for the defense.
At the previous trial, held on March 5, the team received a strong showing from their lawyers on the prosecution, Dalia Etessami, Danny Kroll and Aviva Ort. Their witnesses, Ruben Prawer, Ella Shakin and Ariella Hajibay were marvelous as well. The team hoped to continue advancing in this tournament and represent Nassau County in competing against the schools representing counties from all over New York. Unfortunately, while the team put up a fierce fight at the following trial, held on March 14, they were ultimately defeated by Syosset High School, who would continue to advance to the finals. The team is proud of the significant progress they’ve made since last year.

 

 

Editors-in-Chief: Dalia Etessami, Anna Glasman, Sophie Goldman
Writing Staff: Ella Shakin
Junior Writers: Daniel Kroll, Rachel Ashourzadeh, Adriel Kohananoo, Kayla Kreinik, Rachel Sarraf, Halli Fein, Dylan Makani, Aviram Nessim, Ruben Prawer, Mikael Rahmani, Gabriella Nassimiha, Rebecca Farca, Shlomo Shavolian, Nathan Maidi
Faculty Advisor: Mrs. April Zabinsky